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Get Your Groove On

March 29, 2017

Flowing Through Fluency

There is a movement happening in classrooms right now- a music and movement movement. As a dancer and supporter of all things performing arts- I LOVE it! Educators really desire to connect to our students on a personal level and establish good relationships by simply relating to our kiddos. In Tennessee, teachers also have a law that requires students to get at least 90 minutes of physical activity per week. An hour is actually the preferred amount of time that students should be involved in movement per day based on the researched correlations between students’ positive academic performance and exercise.

As a practitioner, you get it. Kids become restless with too much sitting and lecturing. They just do not pay attention to the lessons or get off task. You may have even been guilty of this yourself. Just think about your last faculty meeting. The human body craves movement! Adding kinesthetic aspects to your lessons will further tap into students’ memory and help them better store the information you are trying to convey. You may even reach some of your reluctant learners as well when you begin to get your groove on in the classroom!

 The weather can sometimes make it more difficult to get as much exercise outside with your students. However, there are easy ways to add some movement into you reading routines and transitions. Let’s start with an easy topic for adding music and movement: fluency! Fluency is my favorite aspect of reading and one that rarely gets enough practice in the regular classroom setting.

Make class fluency folders and change out what you are practicing almost weekly or as soon as your students have mastered the passage you are using so they do not get bored. Even my first graders could help with the management of updating the folders by sliding new pages to practice into clear page protectors when needed. Print out students’ favorite songs and sing them while reading the lyrics. Just make certain the songs are school friendly! Or you can always do what the teachers did in the first two videos I linked below: make up your own class song. Add poetry to your fluency folders and have students help create appropriate movements to accompany the poems. Students can even add a mini performance time to the weekly classroom routines. Dr. Timothy Raskinski, the fluency researcher guru, says that kids need authentic reasons to want to practice reading, and a classroom performance time provides just that! In my classroom, I offered performing fluency passages on a volunteer basis as not to force students who may be uncomfortable reading in front of their peers. Once it caught on, even my shy students were wanting to read and perform in front of the class. With fluency folders, struggling readers have had time to practice the passages (I let my students take these folders home nightly) so they are less afraid of messing up in front of their peers. This can really boost their confidence to have their friends cheer them on and support their reading.

Here are my two favorite music and movement videos for introducing the concept of fluency to students:

Give music and movement a moment in your classroom today!

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