Organization Writing

Little Red Writing Folders

October 21, 2017

Organizing Your Students’ Writing

I needed to make writing a bigger priority in my classroom. There are as many ways to approach writing instruction as there are types of writing utensils! So, I started simply. I got myself and my students organized first. This began with red, plastic, pronged folders. Since writing was going into these folders, I naturally had to name them “Little Red Writing Folders.” Just like that, it stuck.

First, I numbered the folders on the outside with a permanent marker. Since they were plastic they usually lasted a few years and could be reused without student names written all over them.

Now, what goes into a little red writing folder?

Whatever you want, really. Of course, this does depend a bit on the grade level you are teaching. I think the only rule here is to not put TOO much into the folder. It is a “little” red writing folder after all. My folder for the first graders consisted of a few basics. First, you need writing paper in the folder. I placed this on the left-hand side of the folder. If your students are too messy with supplies, you may only distribute one page of writing paper at a time or have a designated tray in the classroom for fresh writing paper. On the right side of the folder, there was room for unfinished pieces or pieces ready for “publication.” I have seen writing workshop folders labeled “in progress” on the left and “finished” on the right side pocket, but again this depends on if you want to store fresh writing paper in their folders or not.

The center prongs of the folders are where I like to have resource pages. There are plenty of options here. I definitely recommend page protectors to keep those resource pages in place longer, and also to ease the transition of different pages over time. Place one or two page protectors in the folders and fill them with: writing prompt ideas the students generated, writing reminders/rules/checklists, sight words/vocabulary words, sequencing words (first, then next, last), model writing samples, or writing style ideas. The possibilities really depend on your writing focus and where your students might need some independent guidance. Here is the checklist I liked to use with my first graders. Since it was in a page protector, students could literally check off this list with their dry erase markers.

Happy hunting for resource pages for your own Little Red Writing Folders. Even older students will get a kick out of the organization of your writing folders. Tootles!

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