Language Reading Writing

V is for Vocabulary

December 19, 2017

Learning New Words

What individual component of reading instruction is most highly correlated to comprehension?  Vocabulary! The more words you know, the more knowledge you possess.  For every word that you can access the meaning to, you can apply that word to your background knowledge and even your speaking or writing.  Give your students the gift of gab this holiday season and by working towards building up their vocabulary!

The top researchers argue about the number of exposures to a word it takes to truly know the word.  There is a discrepancy in the research is since the amount of practice needed with a new word varies greatly among individuals.  Since there is no conclusive evidence on this matter, teachers should think about what vocabulary instruction will best meet your students’ needs.

Even though we are not certain how many times a student needs to practice with a new word to fully “own it,” you might have guessed that a one-time worksheet exposure to the word is simply not going to cut it.  Students need multiple exposures to a word in text and in real life contexts.  I always go for a goal of about 20 exposure to a new vocabulary word with my students.  Yes, some needed more time and some needed less- but 20 exposures is always a good starting point.  Besides introducing the words and having the students use the words in sentences, think of some other ways students will be held accountable for using their newly acquired vocabulary words.  I had students keep a “word bank” of weekly words in their desks that they cut out during small group time on Mondays.  Each day we used the words in some way. Some days I gave a definition and they had to see how quickly they could pick up the word I was describing.  Sometimes we put the words in alphabetical order.  Other days we looked at lexical features such as the number of syllables or phonemes a word had.  Websites like Wordle or WordItOut create word art or word clouds for your viewing enjoyment, too.  A vocabulary journal works well for students to illustrate new words and refer back to ones they have learned over the school year.

If your students already know a meaningful part of the word, or morpheme, they will be able to better pick up on the new word’s meaning.  Therefore, we teach affixes such as prefixes or suffixes.  Students can study roots, too.  The English language is made up of many Greek and Latin roots, so having a base knowledge of the more common roots will help your students immensely.  Refer to this chart to help you out and good luck with your lexicon learning!

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